Be an Ethical Entrepreneur, Marketer, and Business Builder

How hippies created the New Rich while influencing your ideas of time and money

If you don’t know who the New Rich are keep reading because we’ll get to that… First, some history on how they were created… The history is important because it will explain a bit about your personal conflicts and struggles in balancing work and a career with your need for excitement and family.

Let’s start 3 generations ago… Think post World War 2 and the 1950’s – commonly known as the baby-boomers. These people viewed jobs, income, being rich and, quite frankly, a whole lot of things differently. Life for the average American was pretty straight-forward:

  1. Go to school
  2. Get a job
  3. Keep job for life
  4. Raise a family
  5. Go to church every Sunday
  6. Teach family athletics, manners, and respect
  7. Take vacation every year
  8. Get the entire family together for major holidays
  9. After 40 years retire with the money you saved, move south, golf and/or fish and spend time with the grand kids
  10. Being rich means having a nicer house, car, and boat than your neighbors.

Life was centered around family and work. Pay was based on a combination of:

  1. Education or Skill
  2. Experience
  3. Number of hours worked

In other words you put in your time in the form of schooling, work-experience, and a long work-week and you were paid well.

Then in the 1960’s and 70’s the hippies came along and decided they didn’t much like their parents out-dated, sheltered, closed-minded and limited view on the world. They questioned and reexamined everything they were taught and decided life was about new experiences more than family or a steady-income. Their lives were a bit different:

  1. They found new experiences in drugs, travel, music, sex, politics and just about anything else.
  2. They stopped going to church or at least as much.
  3. They stopped having large families.
  4. They stopped keeping the same job forever.
  5. “True” hippies tried not to work at all or just enough to fund their next adventure.
  6. Work was no longer a sense of pride but simply a means to an end. A job. Work became a 4-letter word.
  7. Retirement? Don’t you have to have a job to retire from first?
  8. Wealth is about having more experiences and a better understanding of yourself than your neighbors.

Sunset over Jackson Lake in Grand Teton National Park

However, even with their new ideas about the world, pay was still based on the 3 items listed above and all directly related to time input. Obviously not all members of the hippy generation decided to travel down the hippy highway. Quite a few followed in the footsteps of their parents and particularly the “work hard to get ahead” mantra stuck with them. However, they couldn’t fully escape the free-spirited influence of their friends.

Then comes along generations X (1962-81) and more particularly Y (1982-98). We are being raised by parents and in school systems that try to educate us to, “work hard to get ahead” and to “put in your time and it will all pay off.” While at the same time being taught to have balance in our lives. Don’t become a workaholic. Take time to see the world since travel is so cheap these days. And the advice I’ve personally heard about 1,000 times, “take the time to do all of those things while you’re young.” Apparently the solution to the conflicting worldviews of the hippies and the baby-boomers is to be a hippy while you’re young and enjoy all the great new experiences that you can handle and then “settle down” and follow the baby- boomers’ formula for success as an “adult.” If you’re Generation Y you know exactly what I’m talking about… Because you’ve heard it, too. If you’re early in Gen X or a baby-boomer, you’ve probably said it… 🙂

Come again? I’m supposed to see the world and race motorcycles and skip church and experiment in my 20’s so that I can “get it out of my system” and then somehow be content the rest of my life making the proper decisions, raising a family, working a steady job, and limiting travel to occasional vacations?

I promise you, that plan does not work. How do I know this? In August, I’ve failed to publish any new blogs because I took a 17 day, 5561 mile, 10 state, 9 national park motorcycle journey throughout the west. The following story has happened to me in some form dozens of times, but here’s one example of how that desire for freedom, expression and new experiences can never be satisfied once you’ve tasted it.

My bike outside of Death Valley NP. FYI: Don't ever ride thru Death Valley in August!

As I’m walking to my motorcycle from the shower facility in Yellowstone National Park I notice a minivan parked next to me with 2 cute little girls running about, both sliding doors and the rear hatch open, a wife running around doing motherly things, and the husband just standing there waiting for me… He’s literally looking straight at me as I walk toward my bike. My bike is fully stocked with saddle bags, camping gear, and everything you need for an extended vacation and this guy noticed… After some small talk while his wife gathers the necessary tools for their showers I ask him if he rides. He HAD been smiling. His wife immediately stops for the first time and with the-smile-that-says-a-thousand-words looks straight at him. He looks at her and I couldn’t help but remark, “Uh oh, your wife is listening to your response so you better get it right.” She doesn’t flinch or take her eyes off of him. He smiles and says, “Yeah, I ride dirt bikes now.” The Mrs. goes back to her motherly duties satisfied with his answer. I bet you can guess his advice to me… “Do it while you’re young.” That was the second or third time in 2 hours that I’d heard that advice. I’ve lost track of how often people tell me that.

Did you catch how he ended his sentence with, “now”? Yeah, me too. Granted this man had a beautiful wife, 2 super-cute little girls, and enough money to take a week long vacation with the family to one of the most awe-inspiring places on earth. He was living the baby-boomer dream… But if you could have seen his face and the way his eyes were transfixed on my motorcycle it would be immensely obvious that something was missing… He had tasted that freedom and adventure, which for him happened to be on a motorcycle, and he wasn’t fully satisfied with his new stable, predictable life. Would you be??? Or if you’re not there yet, will you be? Can you have both that stability and some freedom? Issues with your better half aside…

Along comes what Timothy Ferriss calls in The 4-Hour Workweek, the New Rich. Thanks primarily to the shrinking of the world due to increases in technology, people have started to realize that you can work from anywhere. For 2 years I worked out of the basement of my home for a software company 620 miles away. While taking pictures in Oceanside, OR last week a nice couple told me they moved there and out of the city because the husband “telecommutes” as a software engineer 700 miles away to San Francisco.

In addition, people have realized when you don’t have to deal with small talk at the water cooler or talk to your co-workers about last night’s episode of Survivor you can get a lot more done a lot more quickly. In other words, when working remotely, you can do so more efficiently. This is what the New Rich are all about. The ability to work from anywhere more efficiently than their co-workers sitting in an office.

There’s more to the story thanks to the hippies, though… As I mentioned earlier, the baby-boomers always thought you traded hours for dollars. More time equals more money. Over time you can save enough money in your nest egg to pay for the time where you won’t be making money in retirement. The New Rich don’t see it that way… As a matter of fact, that’s all wrong. Whereas conventional thought values a person’s wealth based solely on their bank account and possessions, the New Rich consider 2 things:

  1. Cashflow
  2. Timeflow (yeah, I just made that word up)

Cashflow – If you have a steady income, you don’t need a nest egg. In other words, if I have a business that makes me money every month, why do I need a million dollars to retire? Your answer to that should be – “Well you need to work in that business if it’s going to make you money and if you’re working you can’t do the things you want to in retirement.” Good answer. But you’re wrong. It is possible to have cashflow without giving up your life and all of your time. Besides, what good is having all the money in the world if you don’t have the time to enjoy it? Just as importantly, when you’re 68, will you be able to enjoy the same adventures as you can when you’re 28?

Timeflow – I’ll use an example to explain this concept. If you’re a lawyer and you make $208,000 per year and work 80 hours per week, your hourly income is $50/hour. You’re now one of the top income earners in the country and, with a reasonable savings and investment plan, will be rich in short order, right? What if, however, I make $52,000 per year, have no office, can work from a cafe in Jackson Hole, WY or a beach house on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, and only need to work 5 hours per week? Only one hour per day. That translates to $200/hour.  More importantly, I have an extra 75 hours of time that I own, control, and is available to me every week. That control of your time is what I call, timeflow.

Now for the tough part, which is more valuable? Which is more important? This isn’t a trick question. One of them is truly more important and more valuable than the other.

It’s your timeflow for one simple reason: You can lose all of your money and get it back, but once you’ve given up your time, it’s lost forever.

That being the case, when was the last time you went into a performance review and asked for more vacation time instead of a raise? What about when negotiating for your job? Did you offer to give up a week or 2 worth of pay for additional time off? If your time is truly more valuable, what are you doing to improve your timeflow at work or in your business???

If you understand that concept, you understand what it’s like to be the New Rich. To become one of the elite members of the New Rich community you need to work on 3 things:

  1. Cashflow
  2. Timeflow
  3. Mobility

The best way to achieve these 3 things is to own your own business. That business can be a brick-and-mortar, main street style business as Brad Sugars suggests and I have owned. Or it can be an internet business that simply resells products as Timothy Ferriss suggests. Either way, the business has to be absentee-owned so, whether you’re there or not, it’s putting money into your bank account. If the business you’re looking to buy doesn’t allow for absentee ownership, don’t buy it. If the business you own doesn’t provide that option, sell it.

So how did the hippies create a group of people with such financial and business savvy? Well they didn’t do it on their own. The hippies simply taught us the importance of timeflow. They reminded us of the human-spirit’s desire for new experiences and to see new places. The baby-boomers taught us that, to enjoy those things, you still need money. The Generation X and Yers have put those together, wrapped it all up in the latest communications technology, and created this new breed of entrepreneur. Once you’re a member of the New Rich you can decide if you prefer the cars, motorcycles, and boats in the style of the baby-boomers or the travel and experiences in the style of the hippies… That’s the beauty of their lifestyles. They’ve created a way to do what they want to do when they want to do it. You can learn to do the same.

Whether you own a business or have a job, hopefully by understanding how the New Rich are finding balance in their lives amongst all the conflicting information they were taught by their parents and educators, you can better achieve a timeflow and cashflow balance in yours.

To your balanced success, Bryan

P.S. If this makes sense to you and you’re interested in learning how to go about acquiring your own business start with The Fundamentals. If you already own a business, you need to learn how to start improving your timeflow. If you’ve owned that business for any amount of time you may really need to consider moving on and buying one that can truly help you achieve your goals. You may also email me directly for more help.

Why do I buy, build and sell businesses???

Freedom. I could stop my blog there, however I like to write too much… 🙂

Freedom to do what I want, when I want, how I want. If I find a motorcycle for sale 1500 miles from home (as I just did) and I want to take off a few days to go pick it up and ride it home (as I’m doing this week) then I want the freedom to do that. In other words, freedom with my time. Nothing is more important then that. You can always get more money, you can never get more time.

Financial freedom. This one should be simple to understand. After all I can only do the things I enjoy (traveling, photography, motorcycling, coaching, reading, writing, adventure-sports etc.) if I have the money to afford those things. Is there a better way to get both financial freedom and control of your own time than being a business owner?

So that explains the Buy and Build portion, but what about Selling? What does that have to do with freedom? Most businesses have a certain point at which they’re about to hit “critical mass”. Simply put, that business is ready to explode and just needs the right leader at the helm to guide it along. Rarely do businesses have 2 different points of critical mass, however. In other words, if you find a business that has a great need, is in a great market, and has the potential to double or triple in under 2 years, the chances of doing that again at the end of those 2 years is very slim. However, there are always other business’ available where that is true. You just have to find them before the point at which they hit that critical mass and then sell them at their peak (since the sale price will be based on that most recent sales history).

The other reason for selling is that it gives you complete freedom with your time once again. If you buy, build, and sell a business and cash out a short while later with a few hundred thousand dollars (which is very possible) now you can go buy another business, do the same thing all over again, and make more money… Or you can take a vacation. A trip around the world. A missions trip. Buy that car you always wanted, etc. etc. etc. As Timothy Ferriss points out in The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich, the New Rich don’t save their whole lives so they can hopefully retire and, at 65-70 years of age, start enjoying life. The New Rich understand the goal isn’t a certain amount of money in your bank account, but the amount of freedom you have with the money you make. The New Rich don’t save up for retirement because they take mini-retirements all the time. It could be every year, every 6 months, or every other year. That mini-retirement could be for a month, a year, or 10 years. Now is the time to live your life. Not when you’ve saved up enough vacation days or have $1 million in the bank.

Since buying my 2 most recent businesses, I’ve taken trips to Pennsylvania, Florida, Texas, and am taking another cross-country trip this week. All of those trips required me to be out of the office for anywhere from a day to 7 days (the total will be about 3 weeks). They’re all within 5 months of me buying my first business. In the interest of full-disclosure, when I have been at the office, 7 day work-weeks with 14 hour work days are quite frequent.

So how does one setup their business and life to have those freedoms?

  1. You have to be willing to step away from a mistake.
  2. You must never lose track of your goal.
  3. You must be able to work remotely.
  4. You must empower your people.
  5. You can NOT be the expert at the product or service of your business.

In a bit more detail:

  1. If you buy a business, work 60-80 hours per week, and 6 months later haven’t made any significant progress, you need to get out. Take from that experience what you’ve learned and apply the lessons to the next one. Don’t toil for years. It doesn’t take that long to start seeing specific improvements (i.e. more cash in your pocket and more freedom with your time).
  2. For me this is easy. When I was 19 I was diagnosed with Hodgkins Lymphoma. I didn’t think it was that big of a deal. I went through chemo for 6 months and radiation for 3 weeks. It wasn’t fun, but I survived. It never felt to me like it was a near-death experience until 3 years later… My friend, Lindsey Popelas, was 17 at the time of her diagnosis which came within 2 weeks of me learning the same news. After battling for 5 years, it took her life. Why didn’t it take mine? For whatever reason, the Lord wants me here and I KNOW its not to work for 60-80 hours per week for the next 40 years to save up $2 million to retire. Lindsey reminds me of that every day. For that she may be the most influential person I have ever met. That’s a lesson I will never forget. My goal is to have freedom – not job security. Don’t wait till you acquire a deadly illness to resolve to start living your life.
  3. Blackberry’s, servers, ubiquitous internet, GPS tracking, Virtual Assistants, IP phones, etc. etc. etc. make working remotely on almost any business a reality. Start making it your reality.
  4. If your whole team must look to you to take care of every customer complaint and handle every supplier issue and tell them what to do every day, then you have no freedom. Empower your people to make decisions they can effectively make and then use technology to encourage and monitor them.
  5. If you’re the salesman, serviceman, customer service specialist, designer, engineer, doctor, lawyer etc. for your business then what happens when you’re not there? The goal is to leverage the talents of others so that you don’t have to be an expert at anything – except leading and leveraging the talents of others. 🙂

The only exception to selling your business is to keep it if your business is on auto-pilot and can work without you or with very minimal input from you. Neither of my businesses are at that point yet. However if I can’t get them to that point then you can be certain I will sell them, take a mini-retirement, and keep my eyes open for the next opportunity.

To your success, Bryan

P.S. In previous jobs of mine I have earned the ability to work remotely from my basement, take vacations when I want, travel extensively, and still make a considerable living. The hardest thing for every business owner is to find and rely on great quality team members. If you’re one of them, then you’ll be amazed at the freedoms your boss will be willing to provide for you.